Fiction Compare And Contrast Essay Introduction

This interactive guide provides an introduction to the basic characteristics and resources that are typically used when students compose comparison and contrast essays. The Comparison and Contrast Guide includes an overview, definitions and examples. The Organizing a Paper section includes details on whole-to-whole (block), point-by-point, and similarities-to-differences structures. In addition, the Guide explains how graphic organizers are used for comparison and contrast, provides tips for using transitions between ideas in comparison and contrast essays, and includes a checklist, which matches an accompanying rubric.

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Creative Communication Frames: Discovering Similarities between Writing and Art

Graphic organizers assist the development of comparative vocabulary and generate discussions of analogy and metaphor in art as students go on a real or virtual tour of an art gallery.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Teaching the Compare and Contrast Essay through Modeling

The compare and contrast essay is taught through modeling from the brainstorming phase through the first draft.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Examining Plot Conflict through a Comparison/Contrast Essay

Students explore picture books to identify the characteristics of four types of conflict. They then write about a conflict they have experienced and compare it to a conflict from literature.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Finding the Science Behind Science Fiction through Paired Readings

Students read science fiction texts and then use nonfiction texts to extrapolate the scientific principles presented as they discuss the "what ifs" within the context of scientific principles.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Comparing and Contrasting: Picturing an Organizational Pattern

Using picture books as mentor texts, students learn effective strategies for organizing information that compares and contrasts. Students can then apply appropriate organizational strategies to their own papers.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Unit

Tell and Show: Writing With Words and Video

Writers and film buffs alike will sharpen their skills in this multimedia unit as they work together to author and design a digital video.

 

Grades   6 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Comparing Portrayals of Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Photography and Literature

In this lesson, students analyze similarities and differences among depictions of slavery in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Frederick Douglass' Narrative, and nineteenth century photographs of slaves. Students formulate their analysis of the role of art and fiction, as they attempt to reliably reflect social ills, in a final essay.

 

Grades   3 – 6  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

The Tale of Despereaux: Fact or Fiction?

Using the book The Tale of Despereaux, students look a closer look at medieval times to see if the novel accurately portrays this time in history. Looking at key sections of the book, students will use the Compare and Contrast Guide and Map to help them decipher between fact and fiction.

 

Grades   3 – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Organizing & Summarizing

Compare & Contrast Map

The Compare & Contrast Map is an interactive graphic organizer that enables students to organize and outline their ideas for different kinds of comparison essays.

 

Grades   K – 12  |  Student Interactive  |  Organizing & Summarizing

Venn Diagram

This interactive tool allows students to create Venn diagrams that contain two or three overlapping circles, enabling them to organize their information logically.

 

Now that you have your quotes, put them in your outline. For each paragraph, have your mini thesis, the quote you want to use, and then the points for each quote. One basic rule of thumb is that for each quote, you want two sentences after as well as one before it that introduces it to the reader. Don't just put in a quote straight after your topic sentence without any kind of transition to it introducing it or you will drive your professor nuts. This also goes for any scenes you may reference.

At this point, you want your outline to include that you want X quote here, and you will support it by saying Y and Z. I like to use two pieces of evidence for each paragraph. When analyzing and comparing two books in an essay, this makes it easy because each piece of evidence can come from each novel. Or you can switch off paragraphs going from one book and how it supports your thesis to another paragraph about the other book and how it does (or does not) do the same thing. Once you have finished your outline, you can begin writing your analytic essay.

Begin Writing

So, you've finished your introduction paragraph and got started on writing the meat of your essay. For each topic sentence for each paragraph of the body, you will have evidence to support that mini thesis of yours that supports your thesis. Yes, it's like a train that never ends and you're the one directing it. Have no fear, your outline should help make things easier.

Each sentence that you write after the quote is an explanation to the reader for why you chose this quote. Does it best show us how a specific symbol was used in the text? Is it key to the development of a character? Tell us. Then go into analyzing it for us in terms of the big picture, aka your thesis.

At the close of each paragraph, summarize what you just said with the main idea that you just proved and transition to the next paragraph and the next point you will make. Repeat until you get to the conclusion. All of this may sound like learning how to write an essay analyzing two books is too complicated but, once you get into the swing of things, it will become easier.

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